Versions Compared

Key

  • This line was added.
  • This line was removed.
  • Formatting was changed.


English


Panel
bgColor#F6F5F5
borderWidth0

Flexible Compute Unit (FCU) instances have a specific lifecycle from the moment you launch them to their termination. You can manage their lifecycle which implies different consequences regarding its allocated or attached resources.

The following topics are discussed:

Table of Contents
maxLevel2



Include Page
INCL:_GRAPH-sch-InstanceLifecycle
INCL:_GRAPH-sch-InstanceLifecycle

Launch

Launching an instance corresponds to both creating it and then starting it. Once the instance is launched, it enters the pending state until it is created, started and ready to use. The state of the instance then changes to running.
Launching an instance allocates the corresponding physical resources to it. You define the hardware of its host computer thanks to an instance type, and the OS, configuration and possibly software applications installed on it thanks to an Outscale machine image (OMI). For more information, see About OMIs.

The instance receives a unique instance ID, and a private IP address and an associated private DNS name that can only be contacted within the Cloud. If you launch an instance in the public Cloud, it also receives a public IP address and an associated public DNS name. This public IP address is temporary and changes every time you stop and start the instance. For more information, see About Instances > General Information About Instances.

Tip
titleTips
  • To fix a public IP address to an instance of the public Cloud or to add a fixed public IP address to an instance in a Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), you can attach an External IP (EIP) to it, and then use the osc.fcu.eip.auto-attach Outscale tag to fix it through the stop and start process.
  • To launch an instance in the public Cloud without a public IP address and a public DNS name, use the private-only Outscale tag.

For more information, see About External IP Addresses (EIPs) and Configuring an Instance with User Data and Outscale Tags.


Stop and Start

You can stop a running instance at any time, and then start it again. Stopping an instance using the API corresponds to shutting it down using the operating system (OS) command.

You can also force an instance to stop. When doing so, the instance stops without properly exiting running applications.


Warning
titleWarning

Forcing an instance to stop may damage its system.


When you stop an instance, it enters the stopping state, and then changes to stopped. When you start a stopped instance, it enters the pending state, and then changes to running.

When stopping and starting an instance, it keeps:

  • Its instance ID
  • Its private DNS and IP address
  • The EIP attached to it and fixed using the osc.fcu.eip.auto-attach Outscale tag (if so)


Info
titleNote

If the instance is not tagged with the osc.fcu.eip.auto-attach Outscale tag, the EIP is detached from the instance when stopping it.


  • Volumes attached to it (if so)

However, the public IP address and public DNS name assigned to an instance of the public Cloud at launch change through the stop and start process. Data stored in the memory and on ephemeral storage disks are also erased when stopping the instance.

When an instance is stopped, you can modify its attributes like its instance type (amount of vCores and memory). For more information, see Modifying an Instance Attribute.

It is also recommended to stop the instance if you want to treat a volume attached to it. To do so, you need to detach the volume from the instance once it is stopped and to attach it to another instance to treat it. When reattaching the volume to the original stopped instance, beware of using the same device name as the one specified in its block device mapping before starting the instance again. For more information, see Attaching a Volume to an InstanceDetaching a Volume from an Instance and Defining Block Device Mappings. If the instance you want to stop is registered with a load balancer, it is recommended to deregister it before stopping it, and to start it before registering it again if needed. For more information, see Managing the Load with Load Balancing Unit (LBU).

Force Stop

If regular stop does not work on your instance, you can also force it to stop. Forcing the instance to stop corresponds to unplugging a computer, which means that the system may not stop properly.


Warning
titleWarning

Forcing an instance to stop may damage its system and lose data. Ensure that you no longer need it or that you have backed them up.


Tip
titleTip

You can open the console to check if there is any issue or problem going on. To do so, click Console Output in the Instances tab in Cockpit.


The following list presents the general causes why an instance cannot stop properly:

  • A process is running, which prevents to stop the instance.
    The most frequent reason is that a process is using a filesystem, which means that an operation on the volume is not finished yet. This prevents the filesystem to be unmounted, which is required to stop the instance. Therefore, you need to ensure that no process is using a filesystem (for example, NFS or CRFS) . If there is any, do one of the following three options before trying again to stop the instance:
    • Wait until the process ends.
    • Stop the process.
    • Unmount the volume on which the process is running.
  • An update is in progress (for example, a Windows update).


Warning
titleWarning

Do not force an instance to stop during an update, as it may damage your instance or prevent it from starting again. Some updates may take a lot of time (up to several hours) on small instance types.


  • There are issues with your ACPI calls, required by instances to stop properly. The two main issues are:
    • The instance has crashed. In this case ACPI calls are ignored.
    • The pci-hotplug and acpiphp modules are not installed on your instance, so ACPI calls are not supported. This may happen if you used your own custom OMI to launch your instance.
      You can check the /etc/modules directory to check whether they are installed or not:


Code Block
languagenone
# /etc/modules: kernel modules to load at boot time.
#
# This file contains the names of kernel modules that should be loaded
# at boot time, one per line. Lines beginning with "#" are ignored.
# Parameters can be specified after the module name.
pci-hotplug
acpiphp 


If the modules are not installed, you can create your own custom OMI using an official OMI, and then launch a new instance.


Info
titleNote

If the instance does not stop when using a Force Stop, contact our Support team. Beware that the support will have no other choice but shutting the instance down which may corrupt your data. Ensure you have backed up them.


Reboot

You can reboot a running instance at any time if needed using the API, which corresponds to rebooting the OS. When rebooting, the instance restarts without going through the stop and start process.
The instance is still running and keeps all its allocated resources. Besides, data stored in its memory and on ephemeral storage disks remain available after rebooting an instance.

Anchor
Termination
Termination
Termination

You can terminate an instance that you no longer need. Terminated instances cannot be recovered. The instance enters in the shutting-down state, and then changes to terminated once the termination is completed. The instance remains visible in the terminated state for 1 hour, without any possibility to recover it. 

When terminating an instance, its corresponding physical resources are released and data stored in its memory or on ephemeral storage disks are erased. If an EIP is attached to the instance, it is released but still allocated to your account.

BSU volumes behavior when terminating the instance they are attached to depends on the block device mapping. By default, the root device of the instance is deleted while other volumes attached to it are detached. For more information about how to set this behavior, see Defining Block Device Mappings.

You can also configure two types of termination protection:

  • DisableApiTermination: This attribute enables you to prevent instance termination (by default, enables termination). You can modify this attribute when the instance is stopped. For more information, see Modifying an Instance Attribute.
  • InstanceInitiatedShutDownBehavior: This attribute enables you to define the instance behavior when you stop or terminate it. By default or it set to stop, the instance stops. If set to restart, the instance stops then automatically restarts. If set to terminate, the instance stops and is terminated. You can, for example, automatically terminate an instance at the end of an application by setting this attribute to terminate and asking the instance to stop once the running application is finished.

These two termination protection attributes can be defined when launching the instance. 

 



French


Panel
bgColor#F6F5F5
borderWidth0

Les instances Flexible Compute Unit (FCU) ont un cycle de vie spécifique depuis le moment où vous les lancez jusqu'au moment ou vous les terminez. Vous pouvez gérer leur cycle de vie, ce qui a des conséquences sur les ressources qui lui sont allouées ou attachées.

Les sujets suivants sont abordés :

Table of Contents
maxLevel2



Include Page
INCL:_GRAPH-sch-InstanceLifecycle
INCL:_GRAPH-sch-InstanceLifecycle

Lancement

Lancer une instance correspond à la fois à la créer puis à la démarrer. Une fois l'instance lancée, elle est à l'état pending jusqu'à ce qu'elle soit créée, démarrée et prête à l'usage. L'état de l'instance passe alors à running.

Le fait de lancer une instance lui alloue les ressources matérielles correspondantes. Vous définissez la configuration matérielle du serveur qui l'héberge grâce à un type d'instance, et le système d'exploitation, sa configuration et possiblement des applications logicielles grâce à une image machine Outscale (OMI). Pour en savoir plus, voir About OMIs.

L'instance reçoit un ID unique, ainsi qu'une adresse IP privée et un nom DNS privé associé qui peuvent uniquement être contacté depuis le Cloud. Si vous lancez une instance dans le Cloud public, elle reçoit également une adresse IP publique et un nom DNS public associé. Cette adresse IP publique est temporaire et change à chaque fois que vous arrêtez et démarrez l'instance. Pour en savoir plus, voir Outscale Public IP Addresses.


Tip
titleAstuces
  • Pour fixer une adresse IP publique à une instance du Cloud public ou pour ajouter une adresse IP publique fixe à une instance d'un Virtual Private Cloud (VPC), vous pouvez lui attacher une External IP (EIP) puis utiliser le tag Outscale osc.fcu.eip.auto-attach qui la fixe même lors du processus d'arrêt et de démarrage de l'instance.
  • Pour lancer une instance dans le Cloud public sans adresse IP publique et sans nom DNS public associé, utilisez le tag Outscale private-only.

Pour en savoir plus, voir About External IP Addresses (EIPs) and Configuring an Instance with User Data and Outscale Tags.


Arrêt et démarrage

Vous pouvez arrêter une instance en cours de fonctionnement (running) à tout moment, puis la démarrer à nouveau. Arrêter une instance avec l'API correspond à l'arrêter avec la commande du système d'exploitation.

Vous pouvez également forcer l'arrêt d'une instance. Cette action arrête l'instance sans quitter proprement les applications en cours d'utilisation.


Warning
titleAttention

Forcer l'arrêt d'une instance peut endommager son système.


Lorsque vous arrêtez une instance, celle-ci passe à l'état stopping, puis à l'état stopped. Lorsque vous démarrez une instance arrêtée, celle-ci est à l'état pending, puis passe ensuite à l'état running.

Lors de l'arrêt et du démarrage de l'instance, celle-ci conserve :

  • Son ID
  • Son adresse IP privée et son nom DNS privé associé
  • L'EIP qui lui est attachée et fixée avec le tag Outscale osc.fcu.eip.auto-attach Outscale tag (s'il y en a une)


Info
titleNote

Si l'instance n'est pas taguée avec le tag Outscale osc.fcu.eip.auto-attach, l'EIP est détachée de l'instance lorsque celle-ci est arrêtée.


  • Les volumes qui lui sont attachés (s'il y en a)

A l'inverse, l'adresse IP publique et le nom DNS public associé qui sont assignés à une instance du Cloud public lors de son lancement changent lorsque celle-ci est arrêtée. La mémoire et les données stockées sur des disques de stockage éphémères sont également effacés.

Lorsqu'une instance est à l'état stopped, vous pouvez modifier ses attributs comme le type d'instance (quantité de vCores et de mémoire). Pour en savoir plus, voir Modifying an Instance Attribute.

Il est également recommandé d'arrêter l'instance si vous souhaitez traiter un volume attaché à celle-ci. Pour ce faire, détachez le volume de l'instance lorsque celle-ci est arrêtée et attachez le à une autre instance afin de le traiter. Lorsque vous réattachez le volume à l'instance d'origine arrêtée, assurez-vous d'utiliser le même nom de périphérique que celui précisé dans le block device mapping avant de démarrer l'instance. Pour en savoir plus, voir Attaching a Volume to an InstanceDetaching a Volume from an Instance et Defining Block Device Mappings.
Si souhaitez arrêter une instance qui est enregistrée auprès d'un load balancer, il est recommandé de la désenregistrer avant de l'arrêter, puis de la démarrer avant de l'enregistrer à nouveau si besoin. Pour en savoir plus, voir Managing the Load with Load Balancing Unit (LBU).

Arrêt forcé

Si vous n'arrivez pas à arrêter votre instance avec un arrêt classique, vous pouvez également forcer celle-ci à s'arrêter. Forcer l'arrêt d'une instance correspond à la débrancher, ce qui signifie que le système peut ne pas s'éteindre correctement.


Warning
titleAttention

Forcer l'arrêt d'une instance peut endommager le système et corrompre les données. Assurez-vous que vous n'en avez plus besoin ou que vous avez une sauvegarde.


Tip
titleAstuce

Vous pouvez ouvrir la console et ainsi vérifier s'il y a un problème. Pour ouvrir la console, cliquez sur Console Output dans l'onglet Instances de Cockpit.


La liste ci-dessous recense les causes classiques pouvant expliquer pourquoi une instance ne s'arrête pas :

  • Un programme est en cours, ce qui empêche l'instance de s'arrêter.
    La cause la plus fréquente est qu'un programme utilise un filesystem, ce qui signifie qu'un programme est toujours en cours d'exécution sur un volume. Ceci empêche le filesystem d'être démonté, ce qui est requis pour que l'instance s'arrête. Vous devez donc vous assurer  qu'aucun programme n'utilise un filesystem (par exemple, NFS ou CRFS). Si c'est le cas, suivez l'une des trois options suivantes avant de essayer d'arrêter l'instance à nouveau :
    • Attendez que le programme s'arrête.
    • Arrêtez le programme.
    • Démontez le volume sur lequel le programme est en cours d'exécution.
  • Une mise à jour est en cours (par exemple, une mise à jour Windows).


Warning
titleAttention

Ne forcez pas une instance à s'arrêter pendant une mise à jour. Ceci pourrait endommager votre instance ou l'empêcher de redémarrer. Certaines mises à jour peuvent prendre beaucoup de temps (plusieurs heures) sur les types d'instances de faible capacité.


  • Il y a des problèmes avec vos requêtes ACPI, qui permettent aux instances de s'arrêter convenablement.
    Les deux raisons principales sont:
    • L'instance est hors-service. Dans ce cas, les requêtes ACPI sont ignorées.
    • Les modules pci-hotplug et acpiphp ne sont pas installés sur votre instance, donc les requêtes ACPI ne sont pas supportées. Ceci peut se produire si vous avez utilisé votre propre OMI pour lancer votre instance.
      Vous pouvez vérifier dans le répertoire /etc/modules si ces modules sont installés ou non :


Code Block
languagenone
# /etc/modules: kernel modules to load at boot time.
#
# This file contains the names of kernel modules that should be loaded
# at boot time, one per line. Lines beginning with "#" are ignored.
# Parameters can be specified after the module name.
pci-hotplug
acpiphp 


Si les modules ne sont pas installés vous pouvez créer votre propre OMI en utilisant une OMI officielle, et lancer une nouvelle instance.


Info
titleNote

Si l'instance ne s'arrête pas malgré l'arrêt forcé, contactez notre équipe Support. Attention, le support n'aura pas d'autre choix que d'arrêter votre instance, ce qui pourrait corrompre vos données. Pensez à les sauvegarder.


Redémarrage

Vous pouvez redémarrer une instance en cours de fonctionnement à tout moment si besoin avec l'API, ce qui correspond à redémarrer le système d'exploitation. L'instance redémarre sans suivre le processus d'arrêt et démarrage classique.

L'instance reste en fonctionnement (running) et conserve les ressources qui lui sont allouées. Les données stockées dans la mémoire et sur des disques de stockage éphémère restent disponibles après le redémarrage de l'instance.

Anchor
Suppression
Suppression
Suppression

Vous pouvez terminer (supprimer) une instance dont vous n'avez plus besoin. Les instances terminées ne peuvent être récupérées. L'instance passe à l'état shutting-down, puis l'état terminated une fois la suppression effectuée. L'instance reste visible à l'état terminated pendant 1 heure, sans possibilité de la récupérer.

Lorsque vous terminez une instance, ses ressources matérielles correspondantes sont libérées et les données stockées dans la mémoire et sur des disques de stockage éphémère sont effacés. Si une EIP est attachée à l'instance, celle-ci est libérée mais reste allouée à votre compte.

Le comportement des volumes BSU lorsque vous terminez l'instance à laquelle ils sont attachés dépend du block device mapping. Par défaut, le volume système de l'instance est supprimé alors que les autres volumes attachés sont détachés. Pour en savoir plus, voir Defining Block Device Mappings.

Vous pouvez également configurer deux types de protection contre la suppression :

  • DisableApiTermination : Cet attribut vous permet d'empêcher la suppression de l'instance (par défaut, la suppression est autorisée). Vous pouvez modifier cet attribut lorsque l'instant est arrêtée. Pour en savoir plus, voir Modifying an Instance Attribute.
  • InstanceInitiatedShutDownBehavior : Cet attribut vous permet de définir le comportement de l'instance lorsque vous l'arrêtez ou la terminez. Par défaut ou si paramétré sur stop, l'instance est arrêtée. Si paramétré sur restart, l'instance est arrêtée puis automatiquement redémarrée. Si paramétré sur terminate, l'instance est arrêtée puis terminée. Vous pouvez par exemple terminer l'instance automatiquement à la fin d'une application en paramétrant cet attribut sur terminate et en demandant à l'instance de s'arrêter une fois que les applications en cours de fonctionnement ont terminé. 

Ces deux attributs de protection contre la suppression peuvent être définis au lancement de l'instance. 

 





English


Panel
borderColor#FFFFFF
bgColor#F6F5F5
borderWidth2
titleBGColor#E6E6E6
borderStylesolid
titleRelated Pages



French


Panel
borderColor#FFFFFF
bgColor#F6F5F5
borderWidth2
titleBGColor#E6E6E6
borderStylesolid
titlePages connexes





Include Page
INCL:_RC-General-panel-LegalMentions
INCL:_RC-General-panel-LegalMentions